Supreme Court to hear dispute over census citizenship question

Supreme Court to hear dispute over census citizenship question

The Supreme Court on Tuesday will hear the Trump administration’s bid to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Lower courts have blocked the question, ruling that the administration violated federal law and the US Constitution in seeking to include it on the census form. The Supreme Court justices will hold an extended 80-minute argument session, with a ruling due by the end of June.

KCooper
KCooper
Paris Cloud
Paris Cloud 1 year

If we're counting people for the purpose of distributing electors for the Electoral College, then absolutely the citizenship question should be on there because only citizens should be represented by the electors. Otherwise we'd be letting states with sanctuary cities have far more power than they should. edit to remove extra words

Kusandei
Kusandei 1 year

As a few others have previously stated, there are huge issues at stake here. Below ore but three of them. First and foremost is the distribution of resources to maintain our overall population. An inaccurate count means that regardless of citizenship status, necessary funding the maintain infrastructure (e.g. power, roads, water, etc.) will not be properly distributed and thus will harm all residents of a locality. Second, the goal of Congressional Apportionment is to ensure that residents' voices are being heard at all levels of the government. This information is needed to ensure that issues that face the entire community are properly represented. This includes any and all issues that impact citizens as a result of immigrant populations and vice-versa. Finally, we cannot forget that there are MILLIONS of immigrants who are here legally but cannot vote. In other words, they have followed all of the required paths to legally residing in the country, but there several legal statuses once can have that do not include voting. Thus, providing resources on the basis of only those who are citizens completely and totally undercuts the argument that it's fine for those who have documented status to live in the US free from fear of deportation and who can prosper in the country. All of these voices MUST be heard as a community and it's need are based on the total population of the locality. If it helps, consider it this way: is it worth adding the citizenship question if it leads to an undercount (which even the Census Bureau KNOWS it will) and will thus hurt the lives of American citizens? Also, as an aside, many folks are saying we should only count those who can vote, but remember that those under 18 cannot vote. I only point this out not to be pedantic, but to highlight that since many are calling for precise language to be used, it needs to be all or nothing.

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